The Art of Recycling at the National Building Museum

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fridge1.jpgNot only does the National Building Museum in Washington, DC feature a full-scale sustainable house built in its galleries, but it will soon showcase a special exhibit called, “The Art of Recycling: The Coolest Show in Town”.

Volunteers were invited to decorate old refrigerators to make creative pieces of art as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s ENERGY STAR® “Recycle My Old Fridge Campaign. Visitors to the exhibition (from August 25 to September 1st) will vote for their favorite refrigerator art.

The campaign is to bring awareness to the American public about energy-hogging old refrigerators (those 10 years old and up), and how they can be properly recycled and replaced by new refrigerators that are Energy Star rated for improved efficiency. We’re wasting our money and energy, and polluting our environment by keeping those old fridges in use.

Steel, nonferrous metals, and other selected parts of refrigerators can be recycled. Federal law requires that refrigerants, oils, and other compounds must be removed and recovered. Sometimes the foam insulation inside the refrigerator doors is also recovered.
Visit RecycleMyOldFridge.com for more information. Click here for information on rebates and special offers on new refrigerators sold in your area.

The National Building Museum currently shows another environmentally-themed exhibition called Big and Green, and will open a new one dubbed the Green Community on October 23. “The Museum holds lecture series and symposia year-round that examine sustainable design, building and development. Building for the 21st Century, the Museum’s free noon-time lecture series, is also sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.”

photo courtesy of DOE

Tag(s): Energy, Events, For Kids, Kitchens And Baths, Money Saving

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One Response to “The Art of Recycling at the National Building Museum”

  1. Green Events this Fall « Going Green @ Your Library on August 20th, 2008 3:53 pm

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